Opinion: Griffith and Leeton Business Chambers tackle political obscurity with changing faces

The MIA’s Business Chambers have changed their ethos and ways of operating over the decades.

It’s nothing unusual, many long-time boards and organsisations mold and evolve into different entities over time.

Griffith’s and Leeton’s Business Chambers are good examples of this.

Despite having their minor differences, both groups aim to be a vehicle for providing their cities with alternative ideas, rather than exclusively playing the role of lobby groups for local businesses.

The changing face of politics and public sentiment on established organisations is prompting changing tactics from these groups. 

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Political groups locally, nationally and everything in between are far more mindful of image than ever before, knowing they are part of an age where consumers are far less interested in the full-story on policy, and in politics in general.

The two largest business chambers in the MIA are adopting a youth-first policy, and it’s not a bad idea.

Matt Gatt, a 28-year-old full-time caterer, was elected to head the new Leeton Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI) executive committee in early October.

The Griffith Chamber now features two new vice presidents – 28-year-old Griffith newcomer Joshua Nadzielski and 34-year-old entrepreneur Katie Lucantonio. 

Engaging a younger group of contributors means the chambers are attempting to sure up relevancy, with eyes on the future.

They are also going back to their roots in promoting a far more realistic approach to entrepreneurship and encouraging start ups, rather than a heavy focus on established business owners, and providing a fresh view on the fast-changing business climate.

It’s not to say experience doesn’t have a place on these boards though. 

No doubt they will look to build on past success with fresh and innovative ideas.

A blend of old and new.

But it’s fair to say both chambers were considering their overall image when compiling their new committee line ups recently.

An injection of youth has shaken up how these boards will be judged by the communities they serve, but they won’t automatically dictate the success of these newly appointed Chamber committees.

Let’s hope the changes bring new tactics, approaches and innovative ideas to the table. What do you think? Email ben.jones@fairfaxmedia.com.au