Budget hits Griffith single mother hard

A HARDWORKING Griffith single mother doesn't know how she will make ends meet or whether she can afford the doctor following Tuesday's federal budget.

Farghana Ayesha Khan works at a local hatchery where she earns $500 a week to look after her family and her income is supplemented by welfare.

MOTHER'S ANGUISH: Farghana Ayesha Khan examines her bills in a bid to find how to make ends meet following the budget.

MOTHER'S ANGUISH: Farghana Ayesha Khan examines her bills in a bid to find how to make ends meet following the budget.

Ms Khan moved to Australia from Pakistan in 2010 to establish a better life for her two girls - Farah, 10, and Fareeha, 12.

On Tuesday night treasurer Joe Hockey announced the welfare payment for single parents, known as family tax benefit B, will cut off when the child turns six which is significantly different to the current situation where it stops when the youngest child turns 16.

"I don't drink, smoke, dine out and I dress in modest clothes and yet I do not make enough to save any money as it is," she said.

"Sometimes I earn less than $500 a week if my children are sick because I have to stay home and look after them, because I don't have anyone I can rely on.

"I want my girls to have the best education, especially because English is not their first language, which is why I invest everything I have into my children."

Ms Khan has been reviewing her budget and said her only realistic options following the budget were to find cheaper accommodation or move her children to the public education system.

"All my pay goes to my daughters' school fees and rent, but without the welfare payments, I will be $204 a month worse off.

"If I get a second job, who will look after my kids, feed them and put them to bed?

"We might have to move to a worse neighbourhood or maybe I will need to take my daughters out of school which will be very detrimental to them."

Ms Khan said she will also avoid seeing her GP unless one of her daughters becomes seriously ill.

"I don't have an explanation for how I will afford $7 to see the doctor," she said.

"If I pay for the doctor, I may not be able to afford the medicine at the chemist anyway."

The poorest single parents will receive $750 a year to soften the blow.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop