Opinion: Never doubt the tribalism of community sport.

LEADER: Griffith captain James Toscan in action against Coolamon in the elimination final. The Swans will be out to continue their charge in Sunday's preliminary final. Picture: Laura Hardwick

LEADER: Griffith captain James Toscan in action against Coolamon in the elimination final. The Swans will be out to continue their charge in Sunday's preliminary final. Picture: Laura Hardwick

Finals time is a particularly emotional part of the year.

Particularly for footy fans (of all codes), and locals enjoying the inclusiveness and social benefits of participating rural team sport.

The smell of freshly cut grass – for footy fanatics, it’s enough to send shivers down their spines.

The sun’s out again after a long dark winter, and fans are either preparing for the emotional exultation or despair of discovering their side’s final premiership credentials.

The build up to the local footy finals is amplified by the avalanche of footy news and advertising from national competitions, as spring rears its head.

Anyone still with some sort of emotional involvement in the national codes’ finals competitions knows how encapsulating the chance of success can be.

To the point where conversations will always inevitably circle back to discussing who’s winning the coming weekend’s games.

But while we’re a self-proclaimed sporting nation, and tribal about our teams’ success, there are just as many people out there taking zero interest in any form of sport shown on television.

It’s hard to get drawn in to the euphoria without following a team, or while watching through a TV.

But for locals wondering what the footy fever fuss is all about, head down to the local footy this weekend. 

Absorb yourself into the contest and become one of the fanatical fans urging on their desperately determined players to victory.

And if the boys get up, head back to the footy club to see first hand what it means to a town when its side brings home a flag.