Botched insulation scheme: Mum's anguish 'too much'

WENDY Sweeney should have been celebrating with her son Mitchell on his 27th birthday on August 14.

HAPPIER TIMES: The Sweeny siblings and their mother before Mitchell's tragic death - Justin, Wendy, Brendan and Mitchell in 2009. Mitchell died in February 2010, installing foil insulation under the government's rebate program.

HAPPIER TIMES: The Sweeny siblings and their mother before Mitchell's tragic death - Justin, Wendy, Brendan and Mitchell in 2009. Mitchell died in February 2010, installing foil insulation under the government's rebate program.

But thanks to the Rudd government's botched insulation scheme, the Griffith woman had to endure yet another day of pain.

Mitchell Sweeney was just 22 when he died after being electrocuted while installing insulation for the scheme at a property in far north Queensland.

He was one of four young men, including Matthew Fuller, 25, Rueben Barnes, 16, and Marcus Wilson, 19, who were killed working on projects related to the bungled scheme.

"At 27 he should have had his whole life in front of him but instead we have suffered his loss and sometimes it is almost too much to bear," Mrs Sweeney said.

She said it was hard to comprehend that her son's life had been cut short.

"Do the parents of all those people who have ruined their lives either through drugs, or committed crimes such as rape or murder and all those evil people who have caused so many people to lose their lives through massive tragedies such as 9/11 and the shooting of MH17 feel they have 'lost' their sons?"

Mrs Sweeney said she was sad for all the mothers who had lost a child to illness or an accident.

"There are many wonderful people in the world doing great things and many just getting on with their lives but at times there seems to be an overwhelming sense of evil and hatred in the world," she said.

"I am overcome with sadness not only for my son but for all other mothers in the world who have lost their child by sickness or accident. Where is it all going to end? Will evil eventually take over the world? I hope not."

Mrs Sweeney shared her feelings about the son she lost in the days leading up to the release of the royal commission findings.

It is believed Ian Hanger QC will make serious adverse findings against at least one senior Labor ex-minister and several top public servants.

Sources revealed the government will be urged to compensate hundreds of installation businesses, but not the families for the loss of their loved ones.

The report was delivered to Governor-General, Peter Cosgrove, on Friday.

Titan Insulations was fined $100,000 for failing to conduct its business in a way that was electrically safe following Mr Sweeney's death.

The pink batts scheme has previously been the subject of a Queensland Coronial inquest, which found the federal government had failed to put adequate safeguards in place in its haste to get the ball rolling with the scheme.

There were 55 witnesses who testified before the royal commission.

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