Children look to the past

GENERATIONS of families paid tribute to loved ones on Friday with multiple generations marching together for Anzac Day.

One such family was the Caseys.

Dean, 9, and Sarah, 10, marched with a framed picture of their great-great grandfather and his service medals, but they marched in honour of three uncles as well.

Their father David said his grandfather fought in France in WWI before being called back to service in WWII.

"He then fought the Japanese with his three sons who fought in Malaysia and Borneo," Mr Casey said.

"The three sons got shore leave for a month and came home to their mother, but they'd only been back for four days before there was a knock on the door and they had to go back."

Fortunately, unlike many men, all four returned home at the end of the war.

They weren't the only family celebrating the older generation.

WWII navy veteran Norman Colborne marched with his daughter Sandra Jonas and grandson Scott Rudkin.

Mr Colborne defied medical expectation to take part in the march as he received four blood transfusions only two weeks ago.

The 88-year-old veteran from Edinburgh in Scotland enlisted in the Royal English Navy at 16, though he told them he was 17, and served from 1944-1948 on board the HMS Cavalier before a trip out to Australia changed everything.

"His aunty Amy was a WWI bride who lived in Narrandera and when he got to Sydney his mother told her to go and see his aunt, which is where he met my mum Barbara," Ms Jonas said.

Mr Colborne then transferred to the Royal Australian Navy and served in Darwin dismantling mines on board the HMAS Reserve.

Four generations of family gathered with Mr Colborne at the Griffith Cenotaph to honour his sacrifice in WWII as well as his grandsons currently serving in the Australian navy.

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