Wind down, wind back as daylight savings ends | PHOTOS

Say goodbye to those dark mornings and spend an extra hour in bed... daylight savings is over for another year.

Wagga's Mel Johnson has the time-intensive task on turning back over 1000 timepieces as daylight saving comes to an end. Picture: Les Smith/Daily Advertiser

Wagga's Mel Johnson has the time-intensive task on turning back over 1000 timepieces as daylight saving comes to an end. Picture: Les Smith/Daily Advertiser

What begins as excitement for "barbecue season" in Spring always ends in relief by Autumn as parts of the country that observe Daylight Savings wind their clocks back back one hour.

Stuart Crosthwaite sets the time ready for Sunday morning, when we all need to turn our clocks back one hour. However, cows want to be milked at around 530am irrespective of DST. Picture: Peter Merkesteyn/Border Mail

Stuart Crosthwaite sets the time ready for Sunday morning, when we all need to turn our clocks back one hour. However, cows want to be milked at around 530am irrespective of DST. Picture: Peter Merkesteyn/Border Mail

Losing one hour of sleep raises the risk of having a heart attack, according to a new study. Picture: Forbes Advocate

Losing one hour of sleep raises the risk of having a heart attack, according to a new study. Picture: Forbes Advocate

Hastings Valley Viking David Tunstead is looking forward to the end of the daylight savings. Picture: Picture: Port Macquarie News

Hastings Valley Viking David Tunstead is looking forward to the end of the daylight savings. Picture: Picture: Port Macquarie News

Glen Innes Fire Station commander Matt Goldman and his colleagues are happy to assist seniors to replace their smoke alarm batteries. Picture: Glen Innes Examiner

Glen Innes Fire Station commander Matt Goldman and his colleagues are happy to assist seniors to replace their smoke alarm batteries. Picture: Glen Innes Examiner

Bathurst firefighter Brad McWilliams is asking seniors to be proactive with their fire safety. Picture: Western Advocate

Bathurst firefighter Brad McWilliams is asking seniors to be proactive with their fire safety. Picture: Western Advocate

Daylight saving will see Tasmanian clocks change back one hour at 2am on Sunday. Picture: Mark Jesser/The Examiner

Daylight saving will see Tasmanian clocks change back one hour at 2am on Sunday. Picture: Mark Jesser/The Examiner

Cessnock firefighters Ben Hunter, Cameron Clarke, Shaun Knuth, station officer Craig Prentice and Marc Bender, are urging seniors in the community to change their smoke alarm batteries. Picture: Cessnock Advertiser

Cessnock firefighters Ben Hunter, Cameron Clarke, Shaun Knuth, station officer Craig Prentice and Marc Bender, are urging seniors in the community to change their smoke alarm batteries. Picture: Cessnock Advertiser

Ballarat Station Master Andrew Dark has the clock remote control ready for the end of daylight saving. Picture: Adam Trafford/Ballarat Courier

Ballarat Station Master Andrew Dark has the clock remote control ready for the end of daylight saving. Picture: Adam Trafford/Ballarat Courier

This year, clocks in Victoria, NSW, South Australia, Tasmania and the ACT will need to be wound back at 3am on Sunday, April 6.

In South Australia, SafeWork executive director Bryan Russell issued a reminder this week to residents that they should be prepared for the change in time going into the next week.

CHANGING THE BALLARAT TRAIN STATION CLOCK

“We’re encouraging people to wind their clocks back one hour before going to bed Saturday night,” Mr Russell said.

Daylight saving is not observed in Queensland, Western Australia or the Northern Territory.

States and territories which currently have daylight saving will resume it on Sunday, October 5, 2014.

Perhaps by then we'll all be excited for "barbecue season" once more.